Keratoconus

Keratoconus

ANSWERS KERATOCONUS

Your cornea is what makes it possible for you to see. It is the clear outer lens on the eye and is often called the windshield of the eye. A normal cornea is shaped like a ball. If the structure of the cornea is not strong enough to hold the ball shape, it can start to bulge out into the shape of a cone. With this happens, it is a condition called keratoconus.

What Causes Keratoconus?

A: Doctors do not know for sure why people have keratoconus. In some cases, it appears to be genetic. About 1 out of 10 people with keratoconus have a relative who has it too. It is also associated with eye allergies and excessive eye rubbing.

When Does the Condition Start?

A: Keratoconus often begins when people are in their late teens to early 20s. The vision symptoms slowly get worse over a period of about 10 to 20 years.

What Are the Symptoms of Keratoconus?

A: In the early stages, the symptoms of keratoconus are mild. They include:

  • Mild blurry vision
  • Diminished vision where straight lines look slightly wavy
  • Sensitivity to the light
  • Redness and swelling of the eye


As the condition develops and it reaches the later stages, the symptoms become more noticeable. They include:
  • Increased blurry and distorted vision
  • Increased astigmatism and nearsightedness
  • Contact lenses no longer fit properly or comfortably

How Is Keratoconus Diagnosed?

A: This condition can be diagnosed during a routine eye exam. During the exam, Dr Duncan will examine the cornea. If it doesn't look right, they will measure the curve. In some cases, the Dr Duncan will map the surface of the cornea using a computer.

How Is Keratoconus Treated?

A: If you are suffering from keratoconus the most common treatment is hard gas permeable lenses. The lenses improve your vision, and also help to hold the shape of your cornea. In more severe cases, Dr Duncan might recommend a corneal transplant.

How Is Keratoconus Treated?

A: If you are suffering from keratoconus the most common treatment is hard gas permeable lenses. Not only will the lenses improve your vision, but they will also help to hold the shape of your cornea. In more severe cases, your eye doctor might recommend a corneal transplant.